Read About Safi, 9 Years Old, Syria Crisis

Safi’s Story

When Safi’s school was attacked and through ongoing violence continued he was hurt when shrapnel hit his face and back. “Someone from our village was going to take me to the hospital,” he said, “but it was too far away”. His scars frighten other children. “They don’t want to play with me” he says. Having fled his home to seek safety and education in Turkey, Safi dreams of becoming a doctor “to help people who are affected by the war and to save their lives.”

Turkey, March 2014. 9-year-old Safi likes spelling the most. He currently lives in Antakya in Turkey.  He explains to us a bit about his life. “I’’m from Latakia. I’’m nine years old. I’’m a second grade student. My favorite subject at school is spelling. I want to be a doctor when I grow up. When I wake up in the morning, I wash my hands and face first, and then I brush my hair. I go to school at 8 o’’clock and I do my homework in the afternoon. Later, I play games in the big park and in the evening I have dinner. I like football — I’m a fan of FC Barcelona. I have two sisters and a brother, but I’’m the eldest. ”

Safi goes on to describe the trauma of war. “My school in Syria closed because of the war. An airplane dropped a barrel bomb on our school. The poorest people ran away after the bomb, which shattered all the windows in our house. I was hurt when they dropped another bomb. I got shrapnel fragments in my face and back. I still have some shrapnel in my back, but I wasn’’t afraid at thosTurkey, March 2014. 9 year old Safi like spelling the most. H was hurt by shrapnel fragments during bombing in Syria and he now lives in Antakya in Turkey. “I’m from Latakia. I’m nine years old. I’m a second grade student. My favorite subject at school is spelling. I want to be a doctor when I grow up. When I wake up in the morning, I wash my hands and face first, and then I brush my hair. I go to school at 8 o’clock and I do my homework in the afternoon. Later, I play games in the big park and in the evening I have dinner. I like football — I’m a fan of FC Barcelona. I have two sisters and a brother, but I’m the eldest. My school in Syria closed because of the war. An airplane dropped a barrel bomb on our school. The poorest people ran away after the bomb, which shattered all the windows in our house. I was hurt when they dropped another bomb. I got shrapnel fragments in my face and back. Someone from our village was going to take me to the hospital, but we couldn’t go because it was too far away from Latakia and it would take a lot of time. I still have some shrapnel in my back, but I wasn’t afraid at those moments at all. I didn’t feel anything. I’m not afraid of airplanes. I am afraid of bears, dogs and wild animals. Syria is more beautiful than here. I miss our house the most. I miss everything there.I want to save people from oppression. I want to become a doctor and I want to help people who are affected by the war and to save their lives. My third wish is to help thieves to persuade them not to steal. I have a friend. I love him so much, but I can’t remember his name. Some of my friends are frightened of me because of the scar on my face. They don’t want to play with me.” According to his teacher, he will have another operation in 20 days with the help of Kuwaiti benefactors.e moments at all. I didn’’t feel anything.”

Safi tells us about his hopes and fears for the future. “I’’m not afraid of airplanes. I am afraid of bears, dogs and wild animals. Syria is more beautiful than here. I miss our house the most. I miss everything there.I want to save people from oppression. I want to become a doctor and I want to help people who are affected by the war and to save their lives. My third wish is to help thieves to persuade them not to steal.”

“I have a friend. I love him so much, but I can’’t remember his name. Some of my friends are frightened of me because of the scar on my face. They don’t want to play with me.””

According to his teacher, he will have another operation with the help of Kuwaiti benefactors.

HOW YOU CAN HELP NOW

To convince the UK Government to take action UNICEF needs to demonstrate mass public support.

Right now, UNICEF are asking the UK public to:

  1. Sign our petition to the Prime Minister David CameronTurkey, March 2014. 9 year old Safi like spelling the most. H was hurt by shrapnel fragments during bombing in Syria and he now lives in Antakya in Turkey. “I’m from Latakia. I’m nine years old. I’m a second grade student. My favorite subject at school is spelling. I want to be a doctor when I grow up. When I wake up in the morning, I wash my hands and face first, and then I brush my hair. I go to school at 8 o’clock and I do my homework in the afternoon. Later, I play games in the big park and in the evening I have dinner. I like football — I’m a fan of FC Barcelona. I have two sisters and a brother, but I’m the eldest. My school in Syria closed because of the war. An airplane dropped a barrel bomb on our school. The poorest people ran away after the bomb, which shattered all the windows in our house. I was hurt when they dropped another bomb. I got shrapnel fragments in my face and back. Someone from our village was going to take me to the hospital, but we couldn’t go because it was too far away from Latakia and it would take a lot of time. I still have some shrapnel in my back, but I wasn’t afraid at those moments at all. I didn’t feel anything. I’m not afraid of airplanes. I am afraid of bears, dogs and wild animals. Syria is more beautiful than here. I miss our house the most. I miss everything there.I want to save people from oppression. I want to become a doctor and I want to help people who are affected by the war and to save their lives. My third wish is to help thieves to persuade them not to steal. I have a friend. I love him so much, but I can’t remember his name. Some of my friends are frightened of me because of the scar on my face. They don’t want to play with me.” According to his teacher, he will have another operation in 20 days with the help of Kuwaiti benefactors.
  1. Send a message of solidarity to children who can’t go to school because it’s not safe
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About the author: AMN